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10 Tips to Stay Safe During a Blizzard

10 Tips to Stay Safe During a Blizzard



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Watching the snow fall from the sky can be calming and therapeutic, but don’t underestimate the power of a blizzard.

Blizzards can cause power shortages, treacherous roadways, and sub-zero temperatures, and if you’re not properly prepared, you may be caught in a dangerous predicament. For pet owners, a new snowfall presents its own set of challenges. If not guided by a leash, dogs can easily get away from their owners and get lost in the snow.

But there’s no reason to be a victim of these blizzard hazards. By employing some simple remedies and precautions, you can enjoy the coziness of the snow storm rather than worry about your safety.

Here are 10 ways to stay safe during a blizzard.

Avoid Alcohol (Seriously)
A “whiskey jacket” is a popular way to stay warm, but drinking too much alcohol is not a good idea in extremely cold temperatures. Alcohol is dehydrating, which is less noticeable during the winter. Alcohol also interferes with the body’s internal thermometer, which can prevent shivering (not a good thing), and result in an accelerated loss of body heat.

Charge Your Cellphone
The importance of a cellphone can’t be overstated. These are the ultimate emergency devices, so make sure yours is charged and ready to go.

Don’t Forget About Your Pets
Blizzards can be especially hazardous for pets. During heavy snowfall, keep your dog on a leash during walks and add some colorful identifying tags to the collar. Also, be wary of melting ice; it can be very painful for dogs to walk over and is potentially toxic if ingested.

Exercise Caution When Shoveling
Shoveling is a necessity, but it’s also an easy way to throw out your back and even induce a heart attack. Remember to take constant breaks and stay hydrated; it’s a workout after all.

Layer Up
Wearing three to four layers of clothing is the most effective way to insulate your body. Packing on some light-weight jackets or vests underneath a winter coat and wind breaker will allow you to tolerate the winter chill. Runner’s tights and earmuffs are also useful for making sure no part of you is exposed.

Never Use a Generator Indoors
If you have an alternative power source such as a generator, make sure not to use it inside, even if it’s located in a basement, garage, or crawlspace. The fumes it creates contain carbon monoxide, which can be especially dangerous to children, the elderly, and pets.

Prepare a Blizzard Survival Kit
Stock a bag with all the essentials that can help you outlast a long power outage. Batteries, flashlights, a battery-operated radio, bottled water, canned goods, any medications you take, and lots of toilet paper are some of the essentials, but cater your survival kit to your own personal needs.

Stay Inside
Staying off the roads and remaining indoors is the best way to avoid winter hazards, and the perfect chance to whip up some soup, but once the wind and the snow taper off, don’t be afraid to step outside and enjoy the snow.

Use Flashlights Not Candles
During a power outage, avoid using candles if possible. Flash lights are a much safer alternative, especially in a household with children and/or pets.

Watch for Frostbite and Hypothermia
Symptoms for hypothermia include dizziness, exhaustion, and severe shivering. Symptoms for frostbite include numbness; flushed gray, white, blue, or yellow skin discoloration; or waxy-feeling skin. If you think you’re afflicted with either, call 911.

This story was originally published February 9, 2017.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


Follow These Five Steps To Stay Safe In A Blizzard

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In order to keep yourself and your property safe, follow these five steps to make sure you're prepared if a blizzard hits your area.

Follow the storm trackers on your local news. If your local news tells you a blizzard is coming, take the warning seriously. Follow the weather reports closely to make sure you know the storm's timeline. This can help give you the time you need to prepare your home and family for the oncoming storm.

Charge electronic devices. If you know that a storm is coming, make sure you charge your cell phone, laptop and any other electronic device you have. If the power goes out during a storm, your cell phone and laptop may be the only way to stay updated on the storm and contact someone in the event of an emergency. Once you fully charge your electronic devices, try not to use them so that the batteries last throughout the blizzard.

Extreme winter weather was the third most costly type of natural disaster between 1991 and 2010, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

Stay inside and off the roads. This sounds like a no-brainer, but it's one of the most important aspects of staying safe in a blizzard. Driving becomes dangerous not only because of road conditions, but also reduced visibility. If you are in the middle of a long drive when a blizzard hits, it's best to stop at a hotel if at all possible. No deadline is worth risking your life. Should you find yourself stranded in a car, only run the engine for about ten minutes every hour to keep the car warm. Crack the window periodically and make sure the tailpipe is not blocked by snow to prevent carbon monoxide from accumulating in the car.

Prepare to go without power and heat. Creating an emergency supply kit for blizzards is an excellent idea. Be sure to include candles, matches, flashlights, batteries, warm clothes for everyone in your family and plenty of non-perishable food. Also have a stock of bottled water on hand. You'll need about a gallon of clean drinking water per person, per day. Keep your emergency kit in a convenient location, and periodically check to make sure that it is stocked and fully functioning. In extreme cases, a family may have to go days without power. Even if your house is not heated by electricity, be prepared to go without heat. Many boilers depend on electricity to work. To preserve as much heat as possible, turn off the heat in rooms that you aren't using, and cover any cracks under doors or windows with a towel. This will keep the cold air from seeping in your house.

Keep an eye on the accumulated snow on your roof. Barring any structural damage, the average roof should be able to hold about 20 pounds of pressure per square foot. A foot of fresh snow is equal to about five pounds per square foot. This means that it will take about four feet of snow to cause significant stress to your roof. If storms strike in succession make sure you continuously remove snow that's building up on your roof. To avoid getting on a ladder in dangerous conditions, look into purchasing a snow rake, which can extend to reach most roofs. Snow rakes can be purchased at most hardware stores. If it's too dangerous to be outside during the storm, consider hiring a professional to come in and remove snow from your roof.

These five steps will help keep you and your family safe if your area is hit by a blizzard. If your house suffers any damage as a result of the storm, your homeowners insurance policy could cover the cost of the damage. Every coverage is unique, so check your policy for details.


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