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Paint Thinner Chemicals Found in Gravy Mix Right Before Christmas

Paint Thinner Chemicals Found in Gravy Mix Right Before Christmas



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Boxes of gravy granules sold at Lidl UK were tainted with paint thinner chemicals

Two varieties of Kania gravy granules sold at Lidl stores have been recalled right before Christmas for containing harmful levels of a paint thinner chemical.

The holiday season is the prime time for making and eating gravy, so it’s terrible timing for Lidl UK stores, which have just announced a recall of two varieties of just-add-water gravy after they were found to contain harmful chemicals.

According to The Independent, Kania Gravy Granules for Meat and Kania Gravy Granules for Chicken had dangerous levels of a chemical called xylene, which is found in paint thinner but also occurs naturally in petroleum and crude oil.

Exposure to xylene can irritate the mouth, nose, throat, and lungs; in very high levels it can even cause severe health problems.

Because of the xylene levels found in the Gravy Granules, both varieties have been recalled, though the Kania company’s other products are still considered safe for consumption. Gravy Granules with best before dates of October and November 2017 should be returned to stores for a full refund.


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".


Paint Color Mixing Chart

A paint color mixing chart offers a great way to learn how different paint colors are created and how they relate to one another.

A basic paint color mixing chart, or a paint color wheel, is comprised of 12 pure colors. The colors are organized in a way that shows you how they were derived.

Primary paint colors

Red, blue and yellow are called primary colors.

Unlike secondary, tertiary and quaternary colors, primary paint colors cannot be "made" by mixing.

These 3 colors give origin to the rest of the colors you see on the color wheel.

Secondary paint colors

There are also 3 secondary paint colors on a color wheel. They are created when you combine 2 primary colors together in equal amounts.

Notice how the secondary colors are positioned on the paint color mixing chart - right between the 3 primary colors.

Intermediate paint colors

The remaining 6 colors you see on a typical color wheel are called intermediate paint colors. They are produced by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color.

yellow + orange = yellow-orange

green + yellow = yellow-green

On a paint color wheel, the intermediate colors are placed between the primary and secondary colors.

Tertiary paint colors

The third level of mixing paint colors produces tertiary colors. They are formed when 2 secondary colors are combined. For example:

Tertiary colors are usually not displayed on a basic paint color mixing chart, to keep things simple.

Quaternary paint colors

There is a fourth level of mixing paint colors, which is also not shown on a regular color wheel. When 2 tertiary colors are mixed, quaternary paint colors are formed. These colors are the most complex and interesting of all - they add depth and sophistication to paint color schemes.

Whew, 4 levels deep and we are still not done with deriving paint colors! To learn how to create tints, shades, tones and vary the value and intensity of colors, continue to "The ABC's of Mixing Paint Colors".